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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Long-term prognosis following valve replacement. found in the catalog.

Long-term prognosis following valve replacement.

Conference on Cardiovascular Disease 2d Aspen, Colo. 1971.

Long-term prognosis following valve replacement.

by Conference on Cardiovascular Disease 2d Aspen, Colo. 1971.

  • 279 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by S. Karger in Basel, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Heart valve prosthesis.,
  • Heart -- Surgery -- Case studies.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementEd.: J[ohn] H. K. Vogel.
    SeriesAdvances in cardiology ;, v. 7
    ContributionsVogel, John H. K., ed., American College of Cardiology., University of Colorado Medical Center.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC681.A25 A38 vol. 7, RD598 A38 vol. 7
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 281 p.
    Number of Pages281
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5333643M
    LC Control Number72186874

    We aimed to analyse the risk of adverse aortic events after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for BAV insufficiency and concomitant mild-to-moderate dilatation of the aortic root (i.e. BAV root phenotype). is predominantly secondary to haemodynamic effects of transvalvular flow and is associated with a very satisfactory long-term prognosis.   Severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) in patients with aortic stenosis is related to poor prognosis following aortic valve replacement (AVR). Current European PH guidelines recommend adding two different echocardiographic signs to tricuspid regurgitation velocity (TRV) in PH estimation, classifying its probability as low (TRV ≤ m/s), intermediate (TRV .

    Background Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with valve dysfunction, ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection. Management of the ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients is controversial and has been extrapolated from experience with Marfan syndrome, despite the absence of comparative long-term outcome data. Patient outcomes after transcatheter and surgical pulmonary valve replacement for pulmonary regurgitation in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot: .

      Results: NOP-LBBB occurred in patients (%) following TAVR. There were no differences between NOP-LBBB and non-LBBB groups, except for a higher rate of NOP-LBBB after self-expandable compared to balloon-expandable TAVR implantation (38% vs. 6%, respectively; p. ).. At follow-up, there were no differences between NOP-LBBB and non . The bicuspid aorta is thought to have a higher risk of progressive dilation after aortic valve replacement with a subsequently increased risk of adverse aortic events. Our aim was to compare the risk of late aortic events after isolated aortic valve replacement surgery for bicuspid versus tricuspid aortic valve stenosis with concomitant mild to moderate dilatation of the .


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Long-term prognosis following valve replacement by Conference on Cardiovascular Disease 2d Aspen, Colo. 1971. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Objective Surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains the gold standard therapy for severe aortic stenosis. Long-term survival data following AVR is required. Our objective was to provide a detailed contemporary benchmark of long-term survival following AVR among elderly patients (≥65 years) in the UK.

Methods We conducted a retrospective Cited by: Long-term results of heterograft valves / J.P. Binet [and others] --Results of mitral valve replacement with formalin-fixed porcine xenografts / R.S.

Litwak [and others] --Late results with fascia lata valves / W.S. Edwards --Discussion / C.P. Bailey --Pathology of grafted heart valves / J.L. Titus --Discussion / H. Bolooki --Discussion / W.P. The published data for long-term survival are shown in Table 1 1. There are very few data demonstrating the long-term survival in patients following TAVI.

Most centres began with a TAVI program in Walther et al. presented recently the results of TAVI at 3-year follow up. A total of patients underwent transapical aortic valve Cited by: 5.

We used the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database to examine long-term survival among aortic valve replacement patients ≥65 years of age. In-hospital complications and long-term survival were stratified by age, Society of Thoracic Surgeons perioperative risk of mortality, and several by:   Within the subgroup undergoing aortic valve replacement, analysis of relative survival rates Long-term results after prosthetic heart valve replacement are usually presented in actuarial terms (1,2).

Risk factors for premature death have been identified by further analyzing these actuarial curves by univariate or multivariate methods ().Cited by: Introduction. Aortic valve disease is common in the United States, occurring in 2% to 5% of the elderly population.

1 When untreated, symptom progression is both rapid 2 – 4 and lethal, 5 – 8 with a median survival of long-term management of aortic valve disease, and valve replacement.

Reliable aortic valve replacement was one of the most significant advances in the treatment of cardiac disease in this century. It allowed, for the first time, a reliable and reproducible method to palliate the symptoms of aortic stenosis and regurgitation and significantly improved long-term survival over that after medical treatment.

Sporadic attempts at aortic valve replacement had. Durko AP, Kappetein AP. Long-term survival after surgical aortic valve replacement: Expectations and reality. J Am Coll Cardiol ; L ittle information exists on the prognosis of patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR) compared to the general population.

Investigators from Sweden conducted a national observational study to. Objective: Determination of the optimal timing of primary heart valve replacement is an important issue.

The present paper provides a synopsis over early and late survival after primary heart valve replacement, including an evaluation of the excess mortality among heart valve replacement patients compared with the general population. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the excellent clinical long-term results after mitral valve repair.

An adequate repair technique is advocated in order to decrease the immediate postoperative rate of residual regurgitation>1 as this is a main determinant of late failures requiring redo mitral valve surgery.

The need for PPM following aortic valve replacement independently reduces long-term survival. The rate of PPM after SAVR remains very low but dramatically increases resource utilization. As TAVR expands into low-risk patients, impact of PPM placement on long-term survival warrants close monitoring.

Besides efforts to avoid complications during follow-up, optimizing the timing of valve replacement can also improve life expectancy after SAVR. Severe AS results in progressive and irreversible myocardial fibrosis even in asymptomatic patients (11), which negatively affects long-term survival after valve replacement (12).

Long-term Prognosis of Ascending Aortic Aneurysm After Aortic Valve Replacement for Bicuspid Versus Tricuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. Jan;(1) doi: / Epub Dec Authors Evaldas Girdauskas 1. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a viable alternative for the treatment of elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (1, 2, 3).However, the occurrence of arrhythmic events (either bradyarrhythmia or tachyarrhythmia) remains the most frequent complication of TAVR (4,5).Whereas most arrhythmic events post-TAVR are directly related to the procedure or valve.

1. Circulation. Sep 25;(13) Epub Aug Long-term survival after aortic valve replacement among high-risk elderly patients in the United States: insights from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database, to Although aortic valve replacement is a common operation, younger patients have a higher than expected risk of mortality (death) 10 years after a mechanical or a tissue (bioprosthetic) valve replacement compared to what would be expected in the general population.

1 Data suggests that at 10 years after surgery, 1 in 5 patients who undergoes a mechanical aortic valve replacement.

The bicuspid aortic valve (AV) has a prevalence of % in the general population, and is known to be related to aortic stenosis, regurgitation, and aortic aneurysm. 1 Aortopathy occurs in about 50% of patients with bicuspid AV, and the incidence of ascending aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid AV is estimated to be approximately 6 to 8 times higher than that in.

The long-term survival rate was % in the MVS + TVR vs. % in the isolated MVS group (HR ; 95%CI –; p = ). The rate of grade III/IV tricuspid regurgitation (TR) remained low after MVS + TVR during long-term follow-up while the rate of grade ≥ II TR increased slightly in the isolated MVS group.

Conclusions In severe MR due to MVP, mitral valve repair compared with MVR provides improved very long-term survival after surgery for both AL-MVP and PL-MVP. Reoperation is similarly required after repair or replacement but is more frequent after repair of AL-MVP.

Objectives: To identify predictors of operative and postoperative mortality and of functional reversibility after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and severe left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. Methods and results: Between andconsecutive patients (mean (SD) age 72 (9) years) in New York Heart Association (NYHA).

Symptomatic severe aortic stenosis carries a poor prognosis (1, 2). Surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) has, until recently, been the only effective treatment in adults with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis.

For patients who are selected for isolated surgical aortic valve replacement the overall perioperative risk is low (3, 4). This study compared long-term outcomes of biological and mechanical mitral valve replacement (MVR) in patients requiring replacement of the mitral valve where repair was not feasible.

A single-centre registry of patients receiving MVR between and was established. Thirty-day mortality and long-term outcomes were analysed and compared.Life expectancy after aortic valve replacement depends on a number of factors, such as age, overall health, the severity of the illness, and the type of replacement valve used.

Research on life expectancy after aortic valve replacement surgery indicates that for a year-old with a mechanical replacement valve, life expectancy ranged from